Hand hygiene education and individual feedback of hand hygiene frequency and method were effective in increasing hand hygiene frequency and improving nurses’ methodology scores of hand hygiene (Chun et al., 2014).

Independent variable: Hand hygiene education and individual feedback

Dependent variable: hand hygiene frequency and nurses’ methodology scores

Subject: 24 MICU nurses in hospital in Korea

Results: increased in hand hygiene frequency and improving nurses’ methodology scores of hand washing.

Statistical Evidence

The frequency of hand hygiene increased from 46% before the educational sessions to 71.4% after the first education and to 64.9% at the second group education observation (p = .001).
The frequency of hand hygiene increased from 53.1% at pre-education to 74.1% and 71.7% at the first and second time of observations, respectively (p = .001).
The score of the hand washing agent increased from 0.99 to 1.00 at the first and second post education observation period (p = .013 and .053).
The mean score for hand washing methods was 2.84 before group education and increased to 3.65 and 3.89 at the first and second post education observation, respectively (p = .001). Mbefore = 2.84 (SEbefore = 1.12) and Mafter I = 3.65 (SEafter I = 1.11), Mafter II = 3.89 (SEafter II = 0.99), p < .001 (Chun et al., 2014). Reasoning The claim was supported based on the statistical evidence presented above. There was an increased in the hand hygiene frequency by nursing activities before and after the group education. The average score for hand hygiene methods increased by 0.81 to 1.05 points at the first and second post education observations. Individual nurse’s feedback provided improved the frequency and methods of hand hygiene (Chun et al., 2014). Based on the evidence noted above, we can conclude that the result was statistically significant, and the evidences supported the claim. Clinical appraisal Based on Cohn, Jia, & Larson, (2009) evaluation of statistical approach, the research claim supports the statistical data reported in the article. The mean score for hand hygiene method was statistically significant with p <.05, meaning that there is less than five percent change the hand hygiene improvement happened by chance. The article failed to identify the power analysis. According to Cohn et al. (2009), a power analysis is used to ensure sample size in a study is adequate in order to properly test the intervention. The chi-square test was used for frequency measurement of hand washing and after group education. The design study used quasi-experimental, the research question was measured and addressed individually.