written by or about guest workers in the Federal Republic of Germany, also known as West Germany. This two-part assignment asks you to 1) complete a grid worksheet and 2) draw connections across primary sources. A copy of this assignment has been posted to Canvas as a Word document so that you can complete the grid and upload your answers. Note that only Word or PDF documents will be accepted.

Step 1) Read all four documents and complete the grid worksheet below.

Author & Title

1-2 sentence summary of the primary source. Writing succinctly is a difficult skill to master. Focus in on the most important point of the primary source and restate it in your own words.

Intended audience:

What audience did the author intend this document for?

What is the point of view of the author. What information gets hidden or obscured by the author’s POV? Who acts? Who doesn’t act?

Giacomo Maturi, “The Integration of the Southern Labor Force and its Specific Adaptation Problems” (1961)

Turkish Labor Placement Office, “How the Turkish Worker Should Behave and Defend His Character in a Foreign Country” (1963)

Letter from Renters to their Housing Development (1979)

Mustafa Tekinez, “Are We Not All Human Beings?” (1982)

Step 2) Write one-paragraph that draws connections among the perspectives offered in these documents. Which documents offer similar perspectives, messages, or biases; how do you know?

Skills practiced in this assignment/Learning goals: Analyzing audience and perspective in primary sources. Synthesizing and drawing connections among forms of evidence. Reading for an argument. Writing succinctly and effectively.

Example:

Author & Title

1-2 sentence summary of the primary source. Writing succinctly is a difficult skill to master. Focus in on the most important point of the primary source and restate it in your own words.

Intended audience:

What audience did the author intend this document for?

What is the point of view of the author. What information gets hidden or obscured by the author’s POV? Who acts? Who doesn’t act?

Anonymous, Diary Entry of a UCI Student in History 70B (2020)

Written by an anonymous student in History 70B, this excerpt from a diary chronicling online learning during the Coronavirus pandemic expresses irritation at one professor’s constant invocation of dogs in written examples. The author finds this habit frustrating and unhelpful, compounding their sense of anger at the global pandemic that raged in 2020.

This document is a diary and, as such, it appears to have been written with no intended audience in mind. Instead, it seems that the author did not anticipate that their private reflections would one day be made public.

In this document, we hear only from the point of view of the student, who appears fatigued by the demands of online learning. We do not hear the voice of the professor, and as a result we do not know the professor’s motivation for writing obnoxious examples about dogs – probably she thinks she is very clever.

Chelsea Schields, “Manifesto in Defense of Small Breeds” (2020)

This document is a self-described “manifesto” written by the professor of History 70B that systematically lays out all of the reasons why people should stop denigrating small breed dogs, especially Chihuahuas. The author emphasizes above all the loyalty and cuteness of small dogs.

This manifesto was written as a keynote address to be delivered at the National Association for Dog Lovers. As the document is intended to persuade people to love small dogs, it appears that its intended audience was people either unconvinced or skeptical about the advantages of small dogs.

In this document, we hear from a professor who loves small dogs, but we do not hear from those who hate small dogs – nor do we hear from small dogs themselves.

Drawing Connections: The diary of a UCI student and the “Manifesto in Defense of Small Breeds” express very different perspectives on the topic of small dogs. The diary is written from the perspective of a stressed out student who is irritated with their professor’s obsession with small dogs, while the “Manifesto” is written by the professor herself and passionately defends small dog breeds. Though they express different viewpoints and experiences, they complement each other in some ways: the “manifesto” offers insight into the mind of the professor and explains how she came to love small dogs – information that is not otherwise available in the diary. At the same time, the “Manifesto” describes a number of common misperceptions about Chihuahuas, and thus it is possible to glean information about the perceptions of those who do not like these dogs, even as their voices are not directly present her. From this we might infer why the anonymous student is so irritated by the professor’s weekly writing examples.